The Enchiridion - The manual - Translated by George Long (1888)


How much do I want to read more? 8/10

In only 18 pages, the great short book from Epictetus.
It's an old translation, more than 100 years ago, but it still seems readable and relevant to the modern reader.


1

Of things some are in our power, and others are not.
In our power are opinion, movement toward a thing, desire, aversion (turning from a thing); and in a word, whatever are our own acts.
not in our power are the body, property, reputation, offices (magisterial power), and in a word, whatever are not our own acts.
And the things in our power are by nature free, not subject to restraint nor hindrance: but the things not in our power are weak, slavish, subject to restraint, in the control of others.
Remember then that if you think the things which are by nature slavish to be free, and the things which are in the power of others to be your own, you will be hindered, you will lament, you will be disturbed, you will blame both gods and men: but if you think that only which is your own to be your own, and if you think that what is another’s, as it really is, belongs to another, no man will ever compel you, no man will hinder you, you will never blame any man, you will accuse no man, you will do nothing involuntarily (against your will), no man will harm you, you will have no enemy, for you will not suffer any harm.

If then you desire (aim at) such great things, remember that you must not (attempt to) lay hold of them with a small effort; but you must leave alone some things entirely, and postpone others for the present.
But if you wish these things also (such great things), and power (office) and wealth, perhaps you will not gain even these very things (power and wealth) because you aim also at those former things (such great things): certainly you will fail in those things through which alone happiness and freedom are secured.
Straightway then practice saying to every harsh appearance, You are an appearance, and in no manner what you ap- pear to be. Then examine it by the rules which you possess, and by this first and chiefly, whether it relates to the things which are in our power or to the things which are not in our power: and if it relates to anything which is not in our power, be ready to say, that it does not concern you.

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