The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations


How much do I want to read more? 8/10

A very nice book presenting thousands of quotes.


Preface

What is a “quotation”? It is a saying or piece of writing that strikes people as so true or memorable that they quote it.
he dictionary includes the commonest quotations which were found in a collection of more than 200,000 citations assembled by combing books, magazines, and newspapers.
As a result, this book is not—like many quotations dictionaries—a subjective anthology of the editor’s favourite quotations, but an objective selection of the quotations which are most widely known and used. Popularity and familiarity are the main criteria for inclusion, although no reader is likely to be familiar with all the quotations in this dictionary.

1 - A

Henry Brooks Adams

"Chaos often breeds life, when order breeds habit."

"A teacher affects eternity; he can never tell where his influence stops."

Herbert Agar 1897-1980

"The truth which makes men free is for the most part the truth which men prefer not to hear."

Alexander the Great 356-323 B.C.

"If I were not Alexander, I would be Diogenes."

Muhammad Ali (Cassius Clay) 1942

"Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee."

Woody Allen

"Is sex dirty? Only if it’s done right."

"A fast word about oral contraception. I asked a girl to go to bed with me and she said ‘no’."

"Don’t knock masturbation. It’s sex with someone I love."

"My brain? It’s my second favourite organ."

Anonymous - English

There is so much good in the worst of us, And so much bad in the best of us,
That it hardly becomes any of us
To talk about the rest of us.

Who dares wins.

Anonymous - French

The world is full of fools, and he who would not see it should live alone and smash his mirror.

Anonymous - Greek

Know thyself.

Nothing in excess.

Whenever God prepares evil for a man, He first damages his mind.

Guillaume Apollinaire 1880-1918

Les souvenirs sont cors de chasse Dont meurt le bruit parmi le vent.
Memories are hunting horns Whose sound dies on the wind.

Aristotle 384-322 B.C.

Nature does nothing uselessly.

He who is unable to live in society, or who has no need because he is sufficient for himself,
must be either a beast or a god.

What is a friend? A single soul dwelling in two bodies.