Ploductivity - A Practical Theology of Work Wealth


How much do I want to read more? 8/10

Weird but in a good way. Old and modern. I want to read more.
I feel it will be relevant to me, in a deep way.
it's a short book anyway.


FOREWORD

“Just buy my book to unlock the secrets that launched me to where I am today!”
these people made their money by selling people the secret to making money.
This is a question I have also had about various productivity gurus. Have they ever accomplished anything productive outside of telling people how to be productive?

This book you have in your hand is the opposite of all that in almost every way.

the most impressive things I can say about him is that he has never been too busy for his kids. When we were growing up, he always had a book in his hand—but whenever we wandered out and said, “Hey Dad . . .” he would always immediately set his book down and give us his full attention.

PART ONE - A THEOLOGY OF PRODUCTIVITY

AN INTRODUCTION TO TECHNOFULNESS

Is it possible for someone to be both relaxed and driven?

As Peter Drucker said, “Efficiency is doing things right; effectiveness is doing the right things.”

The technophile is the early and eager adapter. He tries everything out, and subscribes to magazines and web digests that help him try everything out. He is the guy waiting overnight on the sidewalk for the latest iPhone release. He can’t wait until some tech giant develops a thumb drive for the base of his skull that will give him instant fluency in Spanish. He is urging Google on in their pursuit of their version of everlasting life, where they will upload his digital consciousness to the cloud.

the basic driving problem is always in the human heart, always in our use of technology, and that use is shaped and driven by our attitudes about it. Maxwell’s silver hammer did come down upon somebody’s head, but we go astray when we blame the silver hammer. The problem was in Maxwell.
Now, what we call technology is simply an array of tools laid out on the bench for us. Technology is therefore a form of wealth.

Our electronic servants may be super fast, but we should be as deliberate as ever.

A THEOLOGY OF WORK