How much do I want to read more? 6/10

I'm both interested in friendship and biography, so this could be a hit two birds with one stone.
“In love, there is always one who kisses, and one who offers the cheek.” Churchill was the suitor, Roosevelt the elusive quarry.
A friendship like Roosevelt and Churchill’s is when two people have an interest not just in each other but also, in a shared external truth or mission.

I'm not really excited to read about this biography now, but it sounds interesting, with many quotes.


[quote, WINSTON CHURCHILL]
The future is unknowable,
but the past should give us hope.

Introduction: A Fortunate Friendship

The Allies in the war against Adolf Hitler’s Germany were three months and four days away from conquering the Third Reich;

[quote, WINSTON CHURCHILL]
“Our friendship is the rock on which I build for the future of the world so long as I am one of the builders.”

Churchill, however, had spent so much time and invested so much of himself in maintaining a connection with the president that he could not quite contemplate life after Roosevelt.

[quote, WINSTON CHURCHILL]
“My thoughts are always with you all.”

the two carried on a correspondence that produced nearly two thousand letters.

French proverb: “In love, there is always one who kisses, and one who offers the cheek.” Churchill was the suitor, Roosevelt the elusive quarry.

With Roosevelt, Churchill was sentimental and shrewd. With Churchill, Roosevelt was cheerful and calculating. Churchill was warmer and more anxious for reassurances about Roosevelt’s affection for him; Roosevelt cooler and more confident, alternately charming and distant.

Roosevelt and Churchill merit close attention, for their world is like our world, and together they managed to bring order out of chaos.

It is, instead, a portrait of what I believe to be the most fascinating friendship of modern times
My aim was to focus tightly on the two men and tell the personal tale of what they meant to each other—and, in the end, to all of us.

the American decision to support Britain in its struggle against Germany in the months before Pearl Harbor; the victory over the Germans in the North African desert in 1942, which kept the Middle East out of Hitler’s hands; the development and control of the atomic bomb; and the timing of the liberation of Europe—were largely products of their personal collaboration.

From the invasion of Poland in 1939 to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, Churchill begged for help from Roosevelt, who had to be convinced Britain was worth American trust and treasure. America’s entry into the war in December 1941 threw them together in what became a spirited friendship that lasted until November 1943.
In 1944 and 1945 they were like an old married couple who knew each other’s vulnerabilities and foibles, yet each considered the other a permanent part of life.

There was a tap at the door, and Churchill said, “Come in.” Roosevelt then appeared and, seeing the nude Churchill, apologized and began to retreat. Stopping him, Churchill said, “You see, Mr. President, I have nothing to hide from you.” Roosevelt loved it.

Quoting Ralph Waldo Emerson in an essay on friendship, C. S. Lewis noted that Emerson once observed, Do you love me? actually means Do you see the same truth? “Or at least,” Lewis wrote, “ ‘Do you care about the same truth?’ ” Though they had their differences—Churchill wanted the British empire to survive and thrive; Roosevelt largely favored self-determination for colonial peoples around the world—they cared passionately about the same overarching truth: breaking the Axis.

A friendship like Roosevelt and Churchill’s is rightly understood as a fond relationship in which two people have an interest not just in each other but also, as Emerson saw, in a shared external truth or mission.