How much I want to read more: 7/10

I'm always amazed how "clutter free" and "minimalist" philosophy is much deeper and powerful as we may think at first sight.

At first glance, it's like: Ok you don't own your stuff, they own you. Get rid of what you accumulate or you may get overwelmed, and it feels so much better to live in a clean environment.

But there's more. Don't stop here or you may miss the deep down roots of the philosophy and why it's worthwile.

See by yourself:

"Did you expect your bed to deliver a great night of sleep? Did you think your computer would make you money?
We’ve assigned so much power to stuff, that it’s become a challenge to let it go.
When you let go of stuff, it may feel like you are letting go of hopes and dreams when in reality, you are making room for them.
you can not depend on stuff. You have to put your trust and faith in people, in yourself, and in God or the Universe."


Introduction

Section 1: Emotion

The Psychology of Stuff

When you lose weight, unless you understand why you were overweight in the first place, and why and how you ate the way you did, the weight will likely creep back on. Similarly, if you jettison your stuff without understanding why you bought it and hold on to it, stuff will creep back in.

Did you expect your bed to deliver a great night of sleep? Did you think your computer would make you money? Would your new glasses make you popular?
We’ve assigned so much power to stuff, that it’s become a challenge to let it go.
When you let go of stuff, it may feel like you are letting go of hopes and dreams when in reality, you are making room for them.
While there are things that can help you accomplish something, you can not depend on stuff.
You have to put your trust and faith in people, in yourself, and in God or the Universe or whatever you believe keeps the world spinning.

When you let go of the idea that the $250 backpack you bought will help you explore the world, you can sell the backpack and start to pay off the debt that is holding you back from traveling.

When you let go of the idea that the box of exercise equipment sitting in your living room will make you fit, you can dump the guilt and go take a walk, or hike, or do whatever activity you truly enjoy and shift towards a healthier lifestyle.

When you box up all the clothes that you thought made you look like a professional or any other way that you wanted to be perceived, you can start being who you are, instead of dressing the way you think you are supposed to.

Stuff is just stuff. It’s plastic or metal, glass or paper. Each piece of stuff is shaped a little differently, but in the end, it will be in the same donation bin or landfill, likely never having met your expectations.

If you need to place trust in stuff, turn towards the good stuff like gratitude, compassion and happiness. Lean into love and laughter and away from another trip to the mall searching for stuff to change your life.

The “Just in Case” Syndrome

When we look at this with actual evidence, we see that “just in case” means we keep a lot of stuff we don’t actually use.

Make a list of the stuff you keep for “just in case” — stuff you haven’t used in the last few months but are worried you might need. Then see how many times in the next 6-9 months you actually use that stuff.

“Just in case” is the reason we hold onto a lot of things. The vast majority of the time, we don’t need them. But we’re afraid we might, so we hoard. It wards off insecurities about the future. Challenge that theory, let go and see what happens. Experience trumps fear.

Holding on to too much “just in case” is comfortable, but dangerous. We’ve lived in excess for so long that it becomes hard to recognize what enough really is.
The only way to see it is to start letting go. With each layer that you discard, you’ll reveal a little bit more about how living with less really does give you more.

Do you really need:

Without “just in case” you became more confident in your choices and learn that you don’t need a back up plan for every decision.